unicornbrain's Activity (154)

  • unicornbrain
    unicornbrain's book review was featured in The Deadly Daylight.
    Have you ever wondered if the people who live in a funeral home were scared or eldritchly? Ash Harrier’s “The Deadly Daylight” will clear up all of your misconceptions as she introduces you to Alice England, a precocious twelve-year-old girl, who lives with her father in a funeral home, and her unwonted clique. Though the unlikely threesome of Alice, Violet Devenish, and Calvin Lee seem harmless enough, the Zombie Queen, Ultraviolet, and Cal’s friendship manifests under the haze of a mystery. Nothing interesting happens in Damocles Cove. Ever. Until the untimely death of Violet’s uncle George. But is his death really a mystery? Alice believes there is more to his death. But why? Harrier’s witty writing of Alice’s attitude to her temporary guests normalizes being surrounded by death and sadness daily while she works with her father in the funeral home. Alice never knew life without dead people whom she always treated with respect. Alice finds solace in working alongside her father and finds she can connect with the temporary house guests. These strong intuitions propel Alice to investigate Violet’s uncle’s death. Unwillingly Violet tags along with Alice in her search for the truth which later becomes an obsession. Would the obsession destroy the new friendship? Was George’s death really related to his health? Was it an accident? Murder? Everyone is a suspect, including his niece Violet, maybe even Cal. The chapter book is an easy read. Comical interactions between Alice, Violet, and Cal keep you entertained as they hang out at school, the funeral home, and some unseemly gatherings at the pier and wharves on the Australian coastline. Alice’s over-the-top vocabulary and keen investigation skills make the mystery fun. But how can it be fun with a rare genetic allergy, illegal exotic animals, and a funeral home all part of the plot? Well, you have to read the book to find out! I would recommend the book for kids ages 13 and older. And grab a thesaurus when you read the book!
    26 days ago
  • unicornbrain
    unicornbrain added a book review.
    Have you ever wondered if the people who live in a funeral home were scared or eldritchly? Ash Harrier’s “The Deadly Daylight” will clear up all of your misconceptions as she introduces you to Alice England, a precocious twelve-year-old girl, who lives with her father in a funeral home, and her unwonted clique. Though the unlikely threesome of Alice, Violet Devenish, and Calvin Lee seem harmless enough, the Zombie Queen, Ultraviolet, and Cal’s friendship manifests under the haze of a mystery. Nothing interesting happens in Damocles Cove. Ever. Until the untimely death of Violet’s uncle George. But is his death really a mystery? Alice believes there is more to his death. But why? Harrier’s witty writing of Alice’s attitude to her temporary guests normalizes being surrounded by death and sadness daily while she works with her father in the funeral home. Alice never knew life without dead people whom she always treated with respect. Alice finds solace in working alongside her father and finds she can connect with the temporary house guests. These strong intuitions propel Alice to investigate Violet’s uncle’s death. Unwillingly Violet tags along with Alice in her search for the truth which later becomes an obsession. Would the obsession destroy the new friendship? Was George’s death really related to his health? Was it an accident? Murder? Everyone is a suspect, including his niece Violet, maybe even Cal. The chapter book is an easy read. Comical interactions between Alice, Violet, and Cal keep you entertained as they hang out at school, the funeral home, and some unseemly gatherings at the pier and wharves on the Australian coastline. Alice’s over-the-top vocabulary and keen investigation skills make the mystery fun. But how can it be fun with a rare genetic allergy, illegal exotic animals, and a funeral home all part of the plot? Well, you have to read the book to find out! I would recommend the book for kids ages 13 and older. And grab a thesaurus when you read the book!
    26 days ago
  • unicornbrain
    unicornbrain added a book review.
    Preposterous! With every possible hair-raising-horror cliche on every nail biting page, this is one book that will either spawn you to jump at any obscure sound and cause you to look over your shoulder…twice, even in broad daylight; or compel you to double over in laughter! Stalking the unexpected reading is a page turner of events unraveling in small town USA. New Rotterdam, can you think of a more fitting name, is a heavily fogged coastal island town that has a reputation that ranks as high as the eerily haunted New Orleans and Salem. So high that it has its own wiki site filled with countless tales of creatures terrorizing the coast line, objects of unbelievably ill-fated consequences and neighbors- young and old - poof, vanished without a clue. Doomsday Archives by Zack Loran Clark and Nick Eliopulos hedge in the reader as your heart leaps into your throat following the tri-, Nick, Hazel and Serena- on what starts out as a haunt to uncover and report on the weird, but true, monsters that have riddled the town into a tourist spot for horror legend seekers. While investigating one story, the trio find themselves turning from reporters to being the story! So if you are hungry, like really hungry, then read Doomsday Archives. Maybe monsters are real. Absurd, right? I would recommend it for readers fourteen and older.
    4 months ago
  • unicornbrain
    unicornbrain added a book review.
    Reading the Bible is an excellent way to learn about yourself. Too much focus is on how others see you or view you. I recommend reading the Bible for self reflection and for the pure joy of reading.
    6 months ago
  • unicornbrain
    unicornbrain added a new comment in
    Well, what can I say? I don't have all the answers, but maybe National Geographic can help with some! Who does not love humorous and curious facts, coupled with opening Pandora's box. Who would not want a book like this for her own library and to share with others! And that is what I do. After I read a book - a few times - I donate them to my favorite charity that gives books to help create home libraries for kids that are in schools that do not have a school library. I own a few NatGeo books and some have found a new home through this charity. I know I WILL ENJOY this book and someone else will too!
    About 1 year ago
  • unicornbrain
    unicornbrain's book review was featured in Target Practice (Cleopatra in Space #1).
    So, I like history. And I really like ancient history. So to find a graphic novel series about Cleopatra was MINDBLOWING!. Let me first warn you, the book is not exactly accurate. This Cleopatra does NOT like school, and that gets her into a lot of trouble. I have read the first book of this series and needless to say, I plan to read them ALL! Cleopatra VII gets transported to an Egyptian-styled future through a mysterious glowing tablet. See. She should have been studying! Questions? What is the mysterious glowing tablet? Where did it come from? Cleopatra VII lands learns she is on Planet Mayet in the Ailuros System. She finds herself going back to school on this foreign planet in hopes to find her way back home. More questions? How can her new friends, Akila and Brian, help her find out how she got to Planet Mayet? Is the destiny of 15-year-old Cleo to battle and protect the Planet Mayet from Xaius Octavian and his Xerx army? I ope you read the first book in this series, too, so you can find out!
    About 1 year ago
  • unicornbrain
    unicornbrain added a book review.
    So, I like history. And I really like ancient history. So to find a graphic novel series about Cleopatra was MINDBLOWING!. Let me first warn you, the book is not exactly accurate. This Cleopatra does NOT like school, and that gets her into a lot of trouble. I have read the first book of this series and needless to say, I plan to read them ALL! Cleopatra VII gets transported to an Egyptian-styled future through a mysterious glowing tablet. See. She should have been studying! Questions? What is the mysterious glowing tablet? Where did it come from? Cleopatra VII lands learns she is on Planet Mayet in the Ailuros System. She finds herself going back to school on this foreign planet in hopes to find her way back home. More questions? How can her new friends, Akila and Brian, help her find out how she got to Planet Mayet? Is the destiny of 15-year-old Cleo to battle and protect the Planet Mayet from Xaius Octavian and his Xerx army? I ope you read the first book in this series, too, so you can find out!
    About 1 year ago
  • unicornbrain
    unicornbrain's book review was featured in Welcome to Feral (Frights from Feral).
    One book. Five curious incidents. Pages of horror and a riveting read. If you like to read bone-chilling and peculiar graphic novels, Mark Fearing’s “Welcome to Feral: Little Town. Big Scares!” will entice you with every chapter! Follow along with Freya, the investigative and conspirative narrator, as she shares all the spooky happenings in Feral. Or, at least, of what she uncovers to be spooky happenings. The horror-themed book contains five short stories, from tales of abandoned ice cream trucks, deep in the middle of a winding woods, to a suspicious troop leader with mysterious habits that leave his terrified troop training for battle. Freya’s nail-biting ideas are bound to keep you on the edge of your seats! Follow along with Freya’s map of Feral covered in posted notes and pushpin, while Freya uses factual details and her interrogative imagination to fill in the blanks of the unusual happenings in Feral, especially surrounding missing kids. Mark Fearing does a spook-tascular job in creating unsettling atmospheres and creative plot twists. I would recommend this book series for ages 10-13.
    Over 1 year ago
  • unicornbrain
    unicornbrain added a book review.
    One book. Five curious incidents. Pages of horror and a riveting read. If you like to read bone-chilling and peculiar graphic novels, Mark Fearing’s “Welcome to Feral: Little Town. Big Scares!” will entice you with every chapter! Follow along with Freya, the investigative and conspirative narrator, as she shares all the spooky happenings in Feral. Or, at least, of what she uncovers to be spooky happenings. The horror-themed book contains five short stories, from tales of abandoned ice cream trucks, deep in the middle of a winding woods, to a suspicious troop leader with mysterious habits that leave his terrified troop training for battle. Freya’s nail-biting ideas are bound to keep you on the edge of your seats! Follow along with Freya’s map of Feral covered in posted notes and pushpin, while Freya uses factual details and her interrogative imagination to fill in the blanks of the unusual happenings in Feral, especially surrounding missing kids. Mark Fearing does a spook-tascular job in creating unsettling atmospheres and creative plot twists. I would recommend this book series for ages 10-13.
    Over 1 year ago
  • unicornbrain
    unicornbrain has read this book.
    Over 1 year ago

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First BookCreate an AvatarWrote First Book ReviewWrote 10 Book ReviewsWrote 25 Book ReviewsWrote 50 Book ReviewsFirst MovieWrote First Movie ReviewJoined National Geographic Kids Book ClubJoined Summer Reading 2018Joined Summer Reading 2019Joined Summer Reading 2020

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