chetoes's Activity (3515)

  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants's book review was featured in Twerp.
    The characters in this book set during the 60's were amazingly memorable. We first hear about the main one, Julian Twerski, a Jewish-American kid living in New York. An interesting fact about him: he is a good sprinter. Another fact: he writes well. This is evidenced by the book you are reading about, which, we are told, was originally put in 9 composition books. As he informs us early on, he's been forced to write something long, on account of the mysterious deed he did over winter break(hint: it involves eggs); so every week or so, he adds 20 pages or so to his diary/book thing, and soon we are left with more than 2-and-a-half hundred pages. So, what exactly does he do during half a year? Mostly, he hangs out with his friends, whose names, as he tells us, are Lonnie, Quentin, Shlomo Shlomo, Eric The Red, and Howie Wartnose. He encounters a major dilemma, however, when his closest friend, Lonnie, tells him to not only WRITE a love letter for him but also to DELIVER the love letter. This amorous message goes to a girl named Jillian Rifkin, who has moved in from "somewhere like Ohio." The problems start when Jillian gets the idea that it was Julian's love note(I mean, he wrote and delivered it, after all.) Then she starts getting interested in him, and stuff happens between him and Lonnie. Sure, other things happen as well, but that's the main one. What stood out to me, at first, was "Twerp"'s casual tone, which was simple and informal, with all the 60's slang in it. The next thing that stood out to me was how the 1960s atmosphere was subtly brought in, through the use of slang words such as "razz" and "yakking it up." Even some of the characters' attitudes towards girls and African Americans. Not only did it have a straightforward style and such, "Twerp" also drew me in because of the relatability of Julian. He's always trying to impress his friends, keep his promises, and is (understandably) concerned about not being the fastest kid at school. However, the book has its minor flaws. For instance, at the end everything goes wrong, then gets right again, and also Julian gets really sentimental: it's sort of cliche. Also, as the whole reason for writing this was the Egg Incident, it was disappointing how it only really got mentioned in detail at the end. It's supposed to be the dark cloud of guilt overshadowing everything, but aside from very brief mentions near the beginning, it just seems like an excuse for Julian to begin talking about other stuff that happens to him. Still, it's an interesting premise, it just could have been done better. It's still a memorable book, and that's why I would recommend it to those connoisseurs of historical fiction set in modern times, especially for those who've read "The Wednesday Wars" by Gary D. Schmidt (it's very similar).
    15 days ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants added a book review.
    The characters in this book set during the 60's were amazingly memorable. We first hear about the main one, Julian Twerski, a Jewish-American kid living in New York. An interesting fact about him: he is a good sprinter. Another fact: he writes well. This is evidenced by the book you are reading about, which, we are told, was originally put in 9 composition books. As he informs us early on, he's been forced to write something long, on account of the mysterious deed he did over winter break(hint: it involves eggs); so every week or so, he adds 20 pages or so to his diary/book thing, and soon we are left with more than 2-and-a-half hundred pages. So, what exactly does he do during half a year? Mostly, he hangs out with his friends, whose names, as he tells us, are Lonnie, Quentin, Shlomo Shlomo, Eric The Red, and Howie Wartnose. He encounters a major dilemma, however, when his closest friend, Lonnie, tells him to not only WRITE a love letter for him but also to DELIVER the love letter. This amorous message goes to a girl named Jillian Rifkin, who has moved in from "somewhere like Ohio." The problems start when Jillian gets the idea that it was Julian's love note(I mean, he wrote and delivered it, after all.) Then she starts getting interested in him, and stuff happens between him and Lonnie. Sure, other things happen as well, but that's the main one. What stood out to me, at first, was "Twerp"'s casual tone, which was simple and informal, with all the 60's slang in it. The next thing that stood out to me was how the 1960s atmosphere was subtly brought in, through the use of slang words such as "razz" and "yakking it up." Even some of the characters' attitudes towards girls and African Americans. Not only did it have a straightforward style and such, "Twerp" also drew me in because of the relatability of Julian. He's always trying to impress his friends, keep his promises, and is (understandably) concerned about not being the fastest kid at school. However, the book has its minor flaws. For instance, at the end everything goes wrong, then gets right again, and also Julian gets really sentimental: it's sort of cliche. Also, as the whole reason for writing this was the Egg Incident, it was disappointing how it only really got mentioned in detail at the end. It's supposed to be the dark cloud of guilt overshadowing everything, but aside from very brief mentions near the beginning, it just seems like an excuse for Julian to begin talking about other stuff that happens to him. Still, it's an interesting premise, it just could have been done better. It's still a memorable book, and that's why I would recommend it to those connoisseurs of historical fiction set in modern times, especially for those who've read "The Wednesday Wars" by Gary D. Schmidt (it's very similar).
    15 days ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants has read this book.
    By Mark Goldblatt
    18 days ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants's book review was featured in The Giver (The Giver Quartet).
    The main character Jonas lives in the future, in a small Community. It is a place without pain, where people are formal and have carefully outlined procedures for things, ranging from Rituals of Loss to Acceptances of Apologies. They follow rules or are formally chastised, or are even punished with the despised "Release", such a mark on the reputation of the family that is never talked about, when it is used as a punishment. On the day of the Ceremony of Twelve, where everyone is given their Assignment, which they have no say in, and which they will keep on doing for the rest of their life, Jonas is chosen to see beyond, acting as the Reciever. The Reciever is the one who holds the memories of countless generations. He is respected, as he holds the most important job of all, but the community rarely uses him. Instead, they usually persist in their traditions. As the Receiver in training, Jonas is given memories by the wise old Giver, the former Reciever. There is pain, but there is also love. As the memories keep coming, Jonas realizes things. He questions the world that he was brought up in. He grows more and more aware of how no one else in the society is like him or the Giver, and realizes that they are all like robots: brought up to not feel, to be precise in their language, and to have no emotions. He begins to wonder if everyone, not just him, should have feelings and emotions. But what can just two people do to change a society? I loved this book. The writing style, overall, was very direct, like the society itself, but the message was the more important part: it was really thought provoking, especially the end. Another perk is that the book was short, just 168 pages in my edition, so you can finish it in just a few days. I highly recommend this to dystopian lovers, but I could see how those who like fast-paced books such as The Hunger Games would prefer other books.
    3 months ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants added a book review.
    The main character Jonas lives in the future, in a small Community. It is a place without pain, where people are formal and have carefully outlined procedures for things, ranging from Rituals of Loss to Acceptances of Apologies. They follow rules or are formally chastised, or are even punished with the despised "Release", such a mark on the reputation of the family that is never talked about, when it is used as a punishment. On the day of the Ceremony of Twelve, where everyone is given their Assignment, which they have no say in, and which they will keep on doing for the rest of their life, Jonas is chosen to see beyond, acting as the Reciever. The Reciever is the one who holds the memories of countless generations. He is respected, as he holds the most important job of all, but the community rarely uses him. Instead, they usually persist in their traditions. As the Receiver in training, Jonas is given memories by the wise old Giver, the former Reciever. There is pain, but there is also love. As the memories keep coming, Jonas realizes things. He questions the world that he was brought up in. He grows more and more aware of how no one else in the society is like him or the Giver, and realizes that they are all like robots: brought up to not feel, to be precise in their language, and to have no emotions. He begins to wonder if everyone, not just him, should have feelings and emotions. But what can just two people do to change a society? I loved this book. The writing style, overall, was very direct, like the society itself, but the message was the more important part: it was really thought provoking, especially the end. Another perk is that the book was short, just 168 pages in my edition, so you can finish it in just a few days. I highly recommend this to dystopian lovers, but I could see how those who like fast-paced books such as The Hunger Games would prefer other books.
    3 months ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants has read this book.
    3 months ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpantsis now following jaxriver.
    3 months ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants's book review was featured in Walk Two Moons.
    First, I should introduce the main character, Salamanca Tree Hiddle, better known as Sal, who has the pack her bags and move to Ohio. She leaves her farm in Bybanks, a fictional small town in Kentucky, and travels to Euclid, which not only is a real place, it is the birthplace of the author. But that was a year ago, and in the present, she is in the car with her two grandparents, who are driving her all the way to Lewiston, Idaho, where her mother is. As they're driving, Sal tells a story that happened to her when she first moved to Euclid. It concerns a strange girl named Phoebe Winterbottom, a mysterious young man, and has quite a few surprising twists... As the book unfolds, more and more details about Sal's past are revealed. This book alternates, with Sal revealing more of her story, and strange things happening to her grandparents. All in all, there were a few key details that could either make you enjoy it or ruin it for you. There's the whole thing about having a story behind another story, as Sal puts it, and the whole other thing about some things being unclear and potentially confusing until later. Then there are the two weird grandparents and Sal, Gramps, and Gram's weird rural way of speaking. For me, the whole idea of having two stories worked out in the end, and I liked the eccentric habits of her grandparents, but I could see why some people would be a little confused. Additionally, the idea of traveling across the US and going to all these small towns was cool, too. I enjoyed how it had a fair amount of humor, and was mostly very engaging and drew me in from the first chapter. If you like somewhat old-fashioned realistic fiction, like some of Kate DiCamillo's stories, you'll like it too. You might even have a "gol-dang" time, as Gramps puts it.
    3 months ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants added a book review.
    First, I should introduce the main character, Salamanca Tree Hiddle, better known as Sal, who has the pack her bags and move to Ohio. She leaves her farm in Bybanks, a fictional small town in Kentucky, and travels to Euclid, which not only is a real place, it is the birthplace of the author. But that was a year ago, and in the present, she is in the car with her two grandparents, who are driving her all the way to Lewiston, Idaho, where her mother is. As they're driving, Sal tells a story that happened to her when she first moved to Euclid. It concerns a strange girl named Phoebe Winterbottom, a mysterious young man, and has quite a few surprising twists... As the book unfolds, more and more details about Sal's past are revealed. This book alternates, with Sal revealing more of her story, and strange things happening to her grandparents. All in all, there were a few key details that could either make you enjoy it or ruin it for you. There's the whole thing about having a story behind another story, as Sal puts it, and the whole other thing about some things being unclear and potentially confusing until later. Then there are the two weird grandparents and Sal, Gramps, and Gram's weird rural way of speaking. For me, the whole idea of having two stories worked out in the end, and I liked the eccentric habits of her grandparents, but I could see why some people would be a little confused. Additionally, the idea of traveling across the US and going to all these small towns was cool, too. I enjoyed how it had a fair amount of humor, and was mostly very engaging and drew me in from the first chapter. If you like somewhat old-fashioned realistic fiction, like some of Kate DiCamillo's stories, you'll like it too. You might even have a "gol-dang" time, as Gramps puts it.
    3 months ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpantsis now following fyf.
    3 months ago

Badges (4)

First BookCreate an AvatarWrote First Book ReviewJoined National Geographic Kids Book Club

Following (41)

maldescendants
auntieb
librarylover12
darihyfo-156675581486
sfayd
ticktok
swrampert23456
thenapdragon
amya264
paulp264
ellyp264
miag356
damarisp264
toono
glittergirl7
grapple
raniah
adexlaa
trevi-bevi
musater
View All

Followers (10)

beachbreeze16
fosterkeefe
voulter
ticktok
11008800
thenapdragon
trevi-bevi
mysterous
redrobin
cr3757

Most DOGO Points

RankNameScore
9326eli555142 points
9327dynamite42142 points
9328destaneyb142 points
9329crazy10142 points
9330corgigirl123142 points
9331chetoes142 points
9332bunnygirl09142 points
9333bull345142 points
9334bj142 points
9335bananaking142 points